Infection Control

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Current infection control regulations, which are mandatory for all dental practitioners, have been developed to prevent or minimise the risk of infection for practitioners and patients alike.

As a registered dental practitioner, you cannot delegate your responsibility for implementing infection control protocols in your practice; if even one registered dental practitioner fails to follow infection control guidelines, the entire practice is in breach.

A practice owner is required to:
 
  1. Have an infection control manual detailing how each practice location implements infection control requirements;
  2. Keep copies of the manual and the following documents in either digital or hard copy:
    1. AS/NZS 4815 or AS/NZS 4187 - most practices fall under 4815
    2. Dental Board of Australia’s Guidelines on Infection control
    3. ADA’s Guidelines for Infection Control
  3. Educate clinical staff on the need for infection control guidelines and the importance of their consistent implementation

A guide to your legal requirements regarding infection control can be found here.

When creating or updating an infection control manual, you should refer to the ADA’s Self-Assessment Tool for Infection Control in conjunction with the ADA’s Guidelines for Infection Control and the Practical Guide to Infection Control.

Support is available through your ADA branch, and the ADA’s Infection Control Committee who can be contacted via email.

All three documents are available as downloadable soft copies only; you will need to print them off to obtain hard copies.
 
  • ADA's Guidelines for Infection Control

    By the Australian Dental Association

    This essential publication, which it is mandatory for every practice to have onsite, describes the infection control processes that dental practitioners and clinical support staff are obliged to implement.

  • Australia and New Zealand Standard 4815

    By Standards Australia

    An integral component of the Dental Board of Australia Guidelines for Infection Control, and hence, the ADA Guidelines for Infection Control, AS/NZ 4815, which covers office-based health care facilities, applies to the vast majority of dental practices.

  • Australia and New Zealand Standard 4187

    By Standards Australia

    An integral component of the Dental Board of Australia Guidelines for Infection Control, and hence, the ADA Guidelines for Infection Control, AS/NZ 4187, applies to larger health organisations such as hospitals and public dental clinics.

  • Dental Board's Guidelines on Infection Control

    By the Dental Board of Australia

    Developed to assist dentists with instituting effective infection control in their practice, specifically focusing on preventing or minimizing “the risk of the spread of infectious diseases in the dental setting.”

  • Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare (2010)

    By the National Health and Medical Research Council

    Contains a range of recommendations designed to help healthcare facilities implement infection control procedures, outlining possible risks and the most effective ways to address them.

  • ADA Hand Hygiene Poster Suite

    By Australian Dental Association

    A collection of posters that demonstrate the approved procedure for ensuring hand hygiene, including how to hand wash or hand rub, the five moments of hand hygiene as well as how to set up a work area correctly.  

  • Creutzfeldt - Jakob Disease Infection Control Guidelines 2013

    By the Department of Health and Ageing

    Outlines the most effective procedures for minimising the transmission of Creutzfeldt - Jakob disease (CJD) in health care settings, including dental practices.

  • The Australian Immunisation Handbook (10th Edition 2013)

    By the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation

    With recommendation developed by the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation and approved by National health and Medical Research Council, this publication “provides clinical advice for health professionals on the safest and most effective use of vaccines in their practice.”

  • Guidelines for the Management of Health Care Workers known to be Infected with Blood-Borne Viruses

    By the Department of Health

    Best practice guidelines for health professionals to assist them in managing blood-borne virus infections for those working in a healthcare setting.

  • The NSQHS Standards Guide for Dental Practices and Services

    By the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care

    Intended as guide for preparing for practice accreditation, these standards aim to assist dental practices in improving the safety and quality of care that they provide to their patients.